• Home
  • Human Proteomics at Extreme Conditions

Human Proteomics at Extreme Conditions

Space flight is one of the most extreme conditions encountered by humans. The factors such as radiation, microgravity, hypodynamia, and isolation disturb homeostatic systems and affect the majority of physiological systems. Many experimental tools and methods have been developed to study the space-induced physiological changes. A better understanding of individual differences on the molecular level may allow us to develop personalized countermeasures to minimize risks to astronauts. Proteomic studies of the space flight effects are mostly limited to various models, such as cultured cells, plants, microorganisms, and animals of various taxonomic groups. The objective of this initiative is to summarize the available proteomic data on the effects of space flight factors on the human body, including both real space missions and ground-based model experiments.

    Current line of work:

    To summarize the available proteomic data on the effects of space flight factors on the human body, including both real space missions and ground-based model experiments.

    Papers:

    Khristenko, N.A., I.M. Larina, and B. Domon, Longitudinal Urinary Protein Variability in Participants of the Space Flight Simulation Program. J Proteome Res, 2016. 15(1): p. 114-24.

    Pastushkova, L., et al., Detection of renal tissue and urinary tract proteins in the human urine after space flight. PLoS One, 2013. 8(8): p. e71652.

    Binder, H., et al., Time-course human urine proteomics in space-flight simulation experiments. BMC Genomics, 2014. 15 Suppl 12: p. S2.

    Pakharukova, N.A., et al., Changes of human serum proteome profile during 7-day “dry” immersion. Acta Astronautica, 2011. 68(9–10): p. 1523-1528.

    Trifonova, OP, et al.,The study of the proteome of healthy human blood plasma under conditions of long-term confinement in an isolation chamber. Bull Exp Biol Med. 2013. 155(1):37-9

    Links to other HPP groups: 

    Participating chromosomes: 18

    Leadership:

    Eugene Nikolaev, Chair

    Irina Larina, Co-chair

    For more information or participation opportunities please contact office(at)hupo.org.



    Copyright 2016 - HUPO

    Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software